BASES Conference
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Welcome

Prof John Saxton FBASES (Chair of the Scientific Programme Committee)


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"I am delighted to welcome you to BASES Conference 2018.

 We aim to provide 2 days of world-leading content across sport and exercise sciences. Whether you wish to present your own research or listen to others, I hope you will join us for what promises to be an outstanding event."

Early bird delegate prices 

Available until Friday 14 September 2018

Professor Ken Fox

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Ken Fox was appointed as Professor of Exercise and Health Sciences at the University of Bristol in 1999 and became Emeritus Professor in 2011. From the days of his early career as a physical education teacher and sport coach, Ken has been dedicated to promoting the field of exercise and public health and for his work was recently made a Fellow (by Distinction) of the Faculty of Public Health of the Royal Colleges of Physicians of the UK.

He has a strong interest in exercise, weight management, mental health and more recently physical activity promotion with older adults. Since the early 80s he has published over 300 research and professional papers, including 35 book chapters. In 2004, he was the Senior Scientific Editor of the Chief Medical Officer's first report on physical activity and public health and has been a key contributor to the recent UK-wide guidelines Start Active, Stay Active. He serves or has served in several public offices including the role of physical activity advisor to the Health Select Committee Enquiry on Obesity, the Foresight Scientific Advisory Panel for Obesity, and the scientific advisory team for the government's obesity cross governmental strategy.

Ken's major research interest is in the psychology of exercise. His book entitled The Physical Self: From Motivation to Well-Being was the first of its type in the field and he developed the Physical Self-Perception Profile which is now translated into about 12 different languages and has been used in many published studies.